O Beautiful Absorbent Land (The Land I Go Potty On)

Ever wonder what is going through your dog’s head when they go potty outside? Here is a great poem that I think all dogs are thinking!

“Where shall I leave my mark?”

O beautiful absorbent land,

Too vast to find itself defiled

By any single dog or child!

So spacious it’s as if you planned

That every mountain, plain, and river,

Every sacred rock and stump

Beseeched my very bowels to quiver!

On you I proudly take a dump.

“There’s nothing like going potty in the fresh air!”

Home Sweet Homey (Dog From Pound)

I’m a round mound of bad hound

Sprung from the bowels of the city pound,

A damp, dirty dog underground–

A pit full of bull and yappin’ mutts,

The whinin’ Lab and the poodle who struts,

Bichon who bays and the King Charles who tuts.

Let me tell you, I survived by growl and guile

Until you gave me a reason to smile

By furnishing me with a domicile.

Word.

Just One More Treat (How Much is Too Much?)

“I promise this is the last time I’ll ask for a treat!”

Just one more treat

I won’t ask again

Just one more treat

And I’ll go to my den

Just one more treat

It’s just a suggestion

Just one more treat

It’s good for digestion

Just one more treat

Perhaps a small bone

Just one more treat

And I’ll leave you alone

Do you feed your dog more than you should?

Pet obesity is on the rise with people feeding more food than they should. Amounts on food bags are more because those companies want you to buy more food than you should. It’s sad that many companies do this just to get more money.

“This is what I see you do everyday. Why can’t I be a couch potato too?”

Feeding your dog too much food and too many treats is not healthy for your pup. This can lead to health problems along the way.

Take my word for it! My Frankie got hefty and developed diabetes. He would act weird like he was out of his mind and start peeing on the carpet where he was standing. He seen the vet immediately.

“Mom, I’m going to pretend that I didn’t hear you call me chunky!”

He was put on insulin for the rest of his life. Getting insulin for your dog without pet insurance is very expensive. It would fluctuate between $100 – $300 for one vile. Frankie was given 3cc every morning and night which stretched the vile for about 6 months. (I have noticed that the longer you have insulin, the weaker it gets.)

He was put on a diet with special food from Science Diet for Weight and Diabolic nutrients. He lost about 12 pounds (which is a lot for a pug)!

“I’m feeling energized and ready to work after getting that extra weight off!”

Food From Vet

You will need a prescription from your vet to get this type of food. Veterinarians want to make sure your dog is getting the right nutrients for their specific condition.

Chloe is a Skinny Machine!

“Mom, it’s time to do some yoga, then we can go for a 4 mile walk!”

I educated myself more on how much a dog should be fed and limiting treats. I’ve kept Chloe at a steady weight of 50 lbs and make sure to limit treats. (Even though she will bug to get a treat!) She usually eats one or twice a day (according how much exercise we do) and gets treats in her B-A-L-L to keep her busy at times. Chloe and I try to walk everyday for around 2 miles. She can still pull me along because we aren’t going fast enough even though she’s 12 years old.

Chloe endorses this toy with her life. If we go anywhere for a day, she has to bring this toy with her. I forgot it once and she whined the whole day even though I gave her treats in other things.

“I’ll wait until you’re done working before I start bugging you to put a treat in my ball.”

Keep your pup happy and healthy!!

Whose Ball This Is I Think I Know (Playing Fetch)

“I swear I just found it!”

Whose ball this is I think I know.

I make him throw and throw and throw.

Some will, no doubt, think him a fool

To play the role of dog-whipped wretch

And expose himself to so much drool

As he makes me fetch and fetch and fetch.

How to Teach Your Dog to Fetch

“Gimmee that ball!!”

While some dogs love to play fetch, and for dogs like retrievers the game comes very naturally. Other dogs may find the idea of fetch foreign. Some dogs don’t have much interest in toys or aren’t naturally inclined to bring toys back after being thrown. Similarly, some rescue dogs may not have had experience playing with toys as puppies and just don’t know what to do with a toy. Fetch is a game that most people want to play with their dog and it can be frustrating if you throw a toy and your dog just sits watching you or goes and gets the toy but doesn’t bring it back. Although fetch doesn’t come naturally to every dog, it is a skill that can be taught!

Supplies Needed to Teach Fetch:

Toys

When teaching a dog to fetch, I like to have an array of toys available. This will let you get a feel for what kind of toys your dog is going to like. Some dogs are ball lovers while others prefer plush toys. If your dog is really not toy motivated (especially if they are a rescue dog who didn’t have a lot of exposure to toys as a puppy) it can help to find toys that have a velcro compartment to put food in can be very helpful. I’ve even used fun fur pencil pouches filled with smelly treats for teaching fetch to dogs who are especially reluctant to put something in their mouth.

Treats

For teaching your dog to fetch you want to have a lot of small pieces of high-value treats.

Clicker

If you use a clicker to train your dog, have it ready. Clicker training can be especially useful to help you communicate with your dog in the early stages of teaching the trick.

Step 1: Teaching Hold

The first step to teaching your dog to fetch is to teach hold:

Teaching Hold

  • Sit on the floor with your dog facing you, while holding a toy show it to your dog.
  • When your dog goes to investigate the toy praise/click and treat. At this stage, you want to reward any interest in the toy.
  • Next, increase the criteria slightly. Wait until your dog sniffs the toy click/praise and treat. Next wait to praise/click/treat until they put their mouth on the toy.
  • When your dog is regularly putting their mouth on the toy, start building duration into the trick by not immediately clicking/praising the instant they put their mouth on the toy. Wait a moment, and while their mouth is still on the toy click/praise and treat. Build up very slowly, adding just a half-second and then a second before you praise/click and treat.

Going very slow here will pay off later.

When your dog is constantly keeping their mouth on the toy for a couple of seconds before you click/praise and treat you can begin introducing a verbal cue like “hold.”

  • Once your dog is keeping their mouth on the toy until you click/praise and treat you can start adding in more time. Again, go very slowly building with fractions of a second of time you are asking your dog to hold. You can also begin moving your hands off of the toy. Then quickly put your hand back on the toy before your dog drops it. Praise, take the object, and give them a treat.
  • Keep your dog successful by working at their pace building the length of time they are asked to hold very slowly. It’s much better to do many repetitions of short holds then asking for one very long hold.
“You’ll give me back my ball if I let you have it, right?”

Step 2: Teaching Fetch

Once your dog has mastered “hold” it’s time to start teaching fetch!

Teaching Fetch

  • Hold the toy out to your dog in your outstretched palm and ask them to “hold”. If your dog takes the toy click/praise and treats. If they don’t take the toy that’s ok. Just practice the above “hold” skills a little more.
  • When your dog is successfully taking the toy from your outstretched hand place the toy on the floor in front of them. Ask your dog to “hold” the toy and when they pick it up immediately praise/click. This is where having gone slowly with building understanding with your “hold” cue will really pay off with your dog being able to generalize the skill to a new location. At this point, you can start to introduce your new verbal cue like “get it” or “fetch.”
  • When your dog has been consistently successful picking up and holding the toy, start moving the toy slightly further away from you. Start with the toy right next to you.
  • Start to very slowly increase the difficulty/distance away from you the toy starts just a few inches at a time.
The goal is to break down the retrieve into very small behaviors. Your dog can become successful instead of starting with the toy next to you and immediately moving it across your yard. That would be too much for a dog just learning the skill.
  • Continue increasing the distance you ask your dog to go to get the toy. As your dog gains understanding in the game, you can begin to alternate between asking your dog to get a toy that you have placed away from you and throwing the toy. It’s a good idea to also vary the toy you are asking your dog to fetch. Practice with balls, plush toys, rope toys etc.
  • Continue to build distance very slowly and keeping your dog’s rewards very high value. You will be building a lot of value in the hold/retrieve game.
“Hey, I was the one that was suppose to fetch that ball!”

With a little patience and consistent practice, the finished skill will be a smooth cued retrieve of any toy. Just remember that for dogs, you teach to fetch the reward isn’t the game itself. Be sure to continue to reward the fetching behavior with treats.

What I Look For In a Poem (Only In Dog Poetry)

“This poem comes straight from my Boxer heart.”

Being a dog loving person and loving a good dog poem, some of the dog topics may sound weird. I like looking for all kinds of information about dogs and different medical health conditions. Sure, I know some topics people may think I’m weird, but I just want to know all I can about keeping fur companions happy and healthy.

Many people feel that they sound stupid or uneducated about dogs. Don’t be shy! I’m here to help you with anything to do with dogs.

No question is a stupid question.

Albert Einstein
“I wish I was bilingual in dog and Human language!”

What I look for in a poem is grace,

In which each word knows its place

And metaphors flow out of sense,

And there’s consistency of tense.

I look for poems about rabies

Or the threat posed by dogs to babies,

That focus on scabies or skin conditions

Or dogs who can’t control their emissions.

But all of it done in extremely good taste!

Because a poem is a horrible thing to waste.

Don’t hesitate to ask any questions. I’ve probably heard them all! Contact Me!

I Hope You’re Having Fun (Biscuit on Nose)

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Training your dog to balance a biscuit on their nose is a great bonding experience. Your dog may not be so happy to wait for a treat that is right on their nose though!!

“Come on, you know this kills me to perform this trick.”

Your lack of kindness–it shows.

Your imagination? Not fecund.

You’re not the owner I would have chose;

My hate for you deepens and grows

With every single second

This biscuit stays on my nose.

Training Your Dog to Balance a Biscuit on Their Nose

With some practice and a lot of patience, you can teach your dog the treat on nose trick.

Let’s teach your dog a trick that reinforces patience with food!

Try the following steps to train the Treat-On-The-Nose trick!

(Brush up on your sit-stay before you attempt this trick.)

Your dog has to sit perfectly still to hold the treat! This trick requires a lot of patience on both parts. Be prepared to stay calm and not get frustrated. Remember this is something fun for you and your dog, not a requirement!

  • Start with a sit-stay directly in front of you while you sit in a chair. Their head should be slightly resting on your lap.
  • Put one hand under the dog’s head and raise its nose until it is level to the floor.
  • Place the treat slowly and gently on the flattest part of their nose.
“You better let me play in the mud after this!”
  • While you rest their muzzle in your hand, alternate praise with the phrase “Hold It!” in your command tone.
  • After a few seconds, release him, praise him, and let him flip the treat off his nose and eat it.*
“Finally I get the biscuit!!”
  • Repeat this process five to ten times per day for several days.
  • As your dog begins to hold their own head steady, begin to remove your hands slowly from their muzzle to let them do it alone.
“I could just roll this biscuit into my mouth!”

*Dropping the biscuit

Some dogs will drop the treat on the floor and pick it up. Others will flip it into the air and catch it. If you want the flip method and your dog is a “dropper”, immediately command them to “leave it” if they drop it. Let them take it if they flip it.

With consistency, this will condition the dog to flip it. If they do not catch it on the first flip, praise the effort with “good dog!” so that they do not give up. When they do catch it, praise vigorously!

Have fun!

“If I could just get my tongue on that biscuit!”

Float Like a Malamute (Fly Like a Butterfly)

Just like us humans, dogs like to celebrate when they have won at something. They like to sing their own song that starts out “Float Like a Malamute”
This is a sports poem that dogs use when they are competing. The human version goes:

“Fly like a butterfly, Sting like a bee. The hands can’t hit what the eyes can’t see.”

Muhammad Ali
Famous Boxer in 1960-1981
“I promise that I’m a lover, not a fighter!”

Float like a malamute

Sting like a saluki

I look kind of cute

But when I hit you, you’ll puki

“I will fight to get the last treat!”

I Am Dog, Hear My Growl

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“Something is going to happen!”

I am dog, hear my growl.

Something’s happening in my bowels.

I hope you have some paper towels.

When Your Dog Has a Stomach Starting to Growl

There’s no worse problems then when your pup has the poops. Especially when they have the accident inside the house! I’ve dealt with lots of accidents from my own dogs and dogs that I have pet sat for.

Pet Sitting Mess

The worst experience I had was when I was pet sitting for two boxers. They were litter mates and still very young (1 year old). They were very active and loved running around the house after each other. (The pet parents were strict of not letting them run in the backyard because they didn’t want mud tracked in.) I would give them walks and play in a certain room they were allowed to run around in.

Well, one of them decided to run downstairs and the other boxer followed. I was guessing they had to potty so we went to the back door. I was only allowed to have 1 at a time in the backyard so one had to wait.

So I let one of them out. All of a sudden all I could smell was poop. I went searching for the other boxer still in the house. Well, he had to REALLY go potty and just let it out on the carpet. He made about a foot around mess of diarrhea. It took most of the roll of paper towels to clean up!

Make sure if you ever pet sit, make sure the owners show you where the cleaning agents are!

Frankie Made A LOT of Messes!

“I’m getting a weird feeling in my belly.”

My poor Frankie had a hard time holding his bowl movements when he got older. He would give you a warning and if you weren’t right there to take him out, he would find a spot near by. With his diabetes, pancreatitis, and some crohns syndrome, it was very hard on his poor tummy.

My mom would stock up on paper towels when they went on sale. It really matters what kind of paper towels to use on messes. Skip the cheap, thin towels.

When it comes to the products that you use to help clean up the mess, make sure it will not damage the area you are cleaning. With carpets and rugs, there a lot of different products, but the ones I choose are:

Try to pick the mess first by scooping up what you can without pressing more into the carpet/rug. Then try dabbing any wetness. Now you can go by what the directions on the bottle say to do. Make sure to get ALL the mess up or your pup will smell that spot and might think it’s alright to go there again!


Also Check Out My Post About: What Your Dog’s Poop is Telling You