Dog Proofing Your House and Yard

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Not all dog dangers are obvious. Keep your furry friends safe and sound by handling all of these potential hazards.

Everyone who gets a dog soon learns that a certain amount of vigilance goes with pet ownership. Puppies especially can get into everything and escape through the tiniest opening. Some of the better-known dangers are toxic plants and food.

But do you know about the other dangers that might lurk in your home and garden? From the bathroom and laundry room to the office, kitchen, garage and even the great outdoors, there are some expected and unexpected hazards your pet might face.

There is good news. First, a lot of these potential dangers are things your pet will probably ignore. More good news, you can easily take care of most of these potential problems. Some of the rules are simply common sense:

Keep small objects and items that can be easily eaten or swallowed out of their way.

As for other dangers, just look around from your pet’s point of view and see what might be tempting and troublesome. Consider pet-proofing your home to be much like baby-proofing. You’re simply making sure that pets and possible problems don’t mix.

There’s even a bonus to these precautions: a tidier house. Storing things safely away after using them also turns out to be much easier than coaxing them away from a pet determined to destroy them, or even worse, making an emergency trip to the vet. And it will leave you with much more room for you and your pet to play with the things that are safe.

Kitchens

Food is, of course, the most common kitchen-related problem. The best-known problem food is probably chocolate, but other possibly toxic foods include avocados, grapes and raisins, macadamia nuts, onions, garlic and coffee. Other things to watch out for are sharp knives and little things like twist ties that can easily be swallowed.

You may want to install a door or gate to keep animals out of the kitchen while you’re cooking.

Bathrooms and Laundry Rooms

Some hazards are obvious: cleansers, detergents, fabric softeners, bleach, medications, vitamins and even dental floss can all be dangerous if eaten or swallowed.

Dogs in particular may be tempted to chew on, and potentially swallow, towels and stray socks (and you were blaming the dryer for eating them), which can lead to severe gastrointestinal problems.

“Yuck!!! Get away from the toilet!!”

There are some other dangers in the bathroom and laundry area that you might overlook. In addition to the “yuck” factor, drinking out of the toilet isn’t good for pets, especially if you use chemical cleansers. Sinks and tubs filled with water and left unattended can pose a drowning hazard for small pets.

Washers and dryers can be a tempting spot for a nap and you may not notice them if you put in a load of clothes. Keep the doors on appliances closed.

“I was just taking a nice warm nap.”

Gathering Areas

There generally aren’t too many dangers lurking in these rooms, but there are a few possible trouble spots. The fireplace is a big one. Pets can be harmed by flames and flying ashes. A simple screen is probably all you need.

Owner: “What are you guys doing? Sticking your brother in the fire will not get rid of his grey muzzle!!”

Another overlooked danger is fire-starter sticks. They’re somewhat sweet, and some dogs can’t resist eating them.

Wires and cords can also be a problem. Chewing on a plugged-in cord can electrocute a pet. Tucking cords away or covering them will keep them out of your pet’s way and also will leave your room looking neater.

“I’m going to get tied up with these cords and my long body!”

As a general precaution, put anything you value or anything that’s a chewing or choking hazards out of reach when you’re not around.

  • puzzle pieces
  • small toys
  • and so on

Opened doors and windows are great for letting in fresh air, but not great if they tempt your animal out into a world of cars and other dangers.

“Should I stay or run after that squirrel?”

Be sure that if pets can get out, they’ll be heading into a safe place, such as a fenced yard. Otherwise, screens are a great compromise. You can even find ones that are almost invisible.

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Bedrooms 

Can you spot the dangers?

Aside from the danger of a puppy’s chewing on your good shoes, bedrooms are generally fairly benign when it comes to pet danger. But to be on the safe side, keep away

  • jewelry
  • hair clips
  • pins
  • bands

One potential serious hazard, though, is mothballs. They’re toxic, so if you use them, be sure they’re in a place your pet absolutely can’t reach.

Areas With Odds and Ends

Everyday objects such as these can all cause problems if chewed or swallowed:

  • batteries
  • buttons
  • coins (especially pennies)
  • paper clips
  • rubber bands

If you’re into crafts, be sure sharp objects, including needles, are out of reach. Plastic bags and plastic wrap can cause suffocation.

Garages and Basements

These are storage areas for lots of things including things that can be a problem if your pets get into them. The simple solution is to keep things either high up or in a closed cabinet like:

  • pesticides
  • gasoline
  • solvents
  • antifreeze
  • coolants
  • oils
  • screws
  • nuts
  • bolts
  • nails

If you live in a snowy climate, be aware that de-icing compounds may also contain dangerous chemicals, so look for ones that are safe for pets.

The Great Outdoors

“I thought you said you needed help with gardening!”

Just as food in the kitchen can be a problem for pets, so can plants in the garden. There are many number of plants that can cause problems. See what plants are toxic.

Garden chemicals can cause problems for pets.

  • Compost
  • cocoa-based mulches
  • pesticides
  • insecticides
  • fertilizers
  • other garden chemicals

Your first line of defense is keeping things stored away safely and out of reach.

Traditional snail and slug bait is also toxic. If you need to keep your vegetables and other plants safe from these marauders, look for barrier methods or pet-friendly bait formulations.

Balconies

Balconies may seem safe, but it’s easy for small pets to slip through the railings or get stuck halfway. Of course, it also would be hard to resist railings, even if your dog could get over or around it.

“I’m stuck!! Put down the camera and help me!”

Be sure latticework is in good repair as well, so pets won’t get stuck or crawl into spaces where they shouldn’t go.

Fire Pits and Barbecues

Just as fireplaces can be a danger indoors, ashes and flames from fire pits and barbecues can be hazardous. Keep an eye on both the fire and your pets, and if you’re barbecuing, keep the lighter fluid out of reach.

“Well, if nobody is tending to the meat, I might as well eat it!”

Pools and Ponds

“Help!!! I can’t fecking swim!!!”

Chemicals are an obvious source of trouble if pets drink from pools and spas, but there are other dangers as well. Even if pets can swim, they can still drown in pools and spas if they can’t get out. Long, low steps may help, but your best approach is to keep pets away from the water, either with covers or fencing or by keeping them inside unless accompanied.

As with pools and spas, ponds might pose a problem if a pet falls in and can’t get out. A sloping side to a pond will provide better footing and give your pond a more natural look.

Ponds are also prone to forming algae, which may be toxic by itself or because of the chemicals added to destroy it.


Yes I know that dog proofing your house and yard sounds like a lot of trouble to go through, but we want to make sure our fur babies are taken care of!!

40 Pics of Stretchy Dog Skin Cuteness

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40 Stretchy Dogs With Extra Skin ‘Squish’ And Extra Cuteness

You Can’t Resist a Dog With Squishy Cheeks

Dogs are known for a lot of qualities. They are loyal, affectionate, obedient, and very intelligent. But the most prominent thing is that they are extremely cute. Nobody can deny that. Dogs are adorable inside and out. If you have a dog around you and you are stressed out, the stress won’t stay for long. Dogs are everyone’s favorite because they know exactly how to cheer someone up. Be it their hilarious shenanigans or their adorable stretched skin faces. Everything works for us.

Just Have to Squish Cheeks

When you find something really cute, you end up squishing its cheeks because it is irresistible. So a lot of dogs get their skin flaps and scruffs stretched by their humans as a sign of love and affection. Scroll down below to see 40 adorable dogs with stretchy skin. And don’t worry, none of them are in pain. They all love it.


1. This poor pup is probably wondering why they are dreaming about their lips getting stuck.

2. The Shibu Stretch!

3. “Very funny guys. I know I have huge cheeks!”

4. “No matter how much you stretch my face, my tongue will not go back inside!”

5. “Stop! You’re making me self conscious of my extra skin!”

6. “I would look way cooler if you didn’t hold out my jaws like wings.”

7. “Yes, I have extra cheek skin. Am I going to get a treat soon?”

8. “Yeth hooman, I have a big thmile!”

9. “I look like a lizard!”

10. “I saved some bread for you. Thorry, it might be a little soggy!”

11. “Stretch all you want. You won’t get rid of my wrinkles!”

12. “Is this what they call a face lift!”

13. “I look so handsome with a big smile.”

14. “I keep telling you my lips get in the way!”

15. “Doctor, can you give me a facelift?”

Taking Care of Dog’s Skin and Winkles

The PDSA had an interview where they explained how to take care of a dog’s sagging skin, winkles and folds. “Dogs have an area on the back of their necks called the scruff where the skin is a little more loosely attached to the body than in other areas. Sometimes, you can feel it moving as you stroke or scratch your dog, but it still has the same nerves and stretch sensitivity as the rest of the skin. It’s important not to pull on any part of your dog’s skin as over stretching their skin can be really painful, just like it would be for a person. This also applies to the scruff of the neck,” PDSA vet Anna explained.

Scruffs

Unlike cats, we should not pick up dogs from the scruffs of their necks. “Instead, if you need to pick up your dog, support them under their chest and back legs to carry them. If they’re a bigger dog, try using a big blanket or a board with the help of a friend or family member if you need to lift them for any reason. Find out more on our first aid guide,” she shared.

Loose Skin Breeds

Shar Peis, French Bulldogs, Pugs, Boxers, and Basset Hounds have naturally loose skin, but other dogs can also develop scruffs and wrinkles due to weight gain. “People often think of skin folds on a dog’s face, but they can also be found in other places, especially if a dog is overweight, for example around their tail, back end or at the tops of their legs.”

Skin Folds

It is essential to clean a dog’s skin folds as they cam develop skin fold dermatitis, which is a terrible infection that affects the “pockets” between skin folds. “The skin in the folds is often very warm and damp, so yeast and bacteria that live on the skin naturally can overgrow, leading to irritated, red, and smelly skin which is itchy and uncomfortable for your dog. If left untreated, skin fold dermatitis can result in ulcers and sores in the folds which can be very painful.”

How to Clean Skin Folds

You can clean your dog’s skin folds by using cooled boiled water, or apply salt water using cotton wool pads. “Be especially careful when cleaning folds near your dog’s eyes. If your dog finds this really uncomfortable, there could be a problem or infection in one of the folds so it’s best to get them checked by your vet. It’s important not to use any other products (such as creams or shampoos) on the skin folds unless you’ve been advised to by your vet—in many cases these can make any irritation or itching worse,” the vet warned.

Brush your dog to maintain a healthy coat. “If they are dirty or muddy, it’s best to just use water to wash them. There are plenty of pet shampoos on the market and these are suitable for most pets, but using them too regularly can lead to dry skin or skin irritation, especially if your pet’s skin is sensitive or they have a skin problem,” she warned. “There are prescription, medicated shampoos available which can help some skin conditions, ask your vet for advice to find out what’s best for your pet.” If you don’t trust them, just use water.

Skin Care

“Many owners worry about their pet’s skin, and sometimes it can be hard to know if your dog has a skin problem. All dogs will lick or scratch now and then and in many cases, it’s nothing to worry about—it’s just part of them grooming their coat. However, if your dog is itching all the time, is making their skin red, they’re losing lots of fur, they have a rash or bumpy skin or you think they may have a wound or infection, it’s best to contact your vet for advice,” Anna said.

Skin Conditions

“There are many causes of skin conditions, from allergies and wounds to fleas, mites, and infections. Some dogs will have a skin problem just once in their lifetime, but for many, skin issues need life-long management or treatment. Fortunately, there are lots of things you can do to help keep your dog comfortable and happy, including medication, special diets, and supplements. The key thing is to get help for your dog early—most skin problems get worse over time and become more difficult to treat.”

Lumps

If you see any irregular lumps forming on your dog’s skin, check with a vet. “They will be able to check the lump and discuss the next options for your pet. Although many owners worry that a new lump could be cancer, there are actually many different causes for lumps and many of these can be treated and won’t lead to more serious problems for your pet. However, it’s better to get any lumps or bumps checked sooner rather than later, especially if they have come up quickly, seem red or painful, or are causing issues for your dog.”

16. “You’ve turned me into a stingray!”

17. Happy face flaps!

18. “My smile goes all the way to my eyes.”

19. Face Smoosh VS. Flying face.

20. “Are you checking to make sure I took that pill?”

21. “Any tighter and I won’t be able to open my eyes!”

22. “Are you telling me I have big cheeks?”

23. “My face can stretch really wide!”

24. “You better be careful stretching my cheekers.”

25. “Why do I look like a quokka?”

26. “I can also stretch my tongue!”

27. “You’ve stretched so much, my ears are gone!”

28. Whose got a big smile!

29. “I believe I can fly!”

30. “My face is going to stay like this if you keep stretching.”

31. “I can fit a lot in my cheeks for later!”

32. How to make a heart faced pug!

33. “This is so humiliating. I don’t go stretching out your extra skin.”

34. I believe this might be a pillow!

35. “I look like a goofy polar bear.”

36. “That’s what happens when you lose so much fat.”

37. “That’s what I call a French smoosh!”

38. “I didn’t know I had wings on my face!”

39. “Why do you love my face to look derpy?”

40. “I’ll always be your little chipmunk.”

Tried Stretching Your Own Dog’s Cheekers?

Did seeing these images make you want to stretch your dog’s cheeks too? Have you tried this on them?